Sít’ Eeti Geeyí, bay in place of the glacier (Glacier Bay) experienced the most dramatic Little Ice Age (~1550–1850AD) in the world. The province was covered by mile-deep ice in the upper reaches, sloping smoothly down to a berg-spewing glacial terminus in Icy Strait (a name no longer descriptive).

During the past 2 centuries many tidewater glaciers have receded onto land. Recolonizing plants and animals followed, and after them, indigenous sealhunters, scientists and tourists. Today, ice covers 700 square miles of a land surface of 2,619 square miles or 27% of the province.

Surficial geology of lower Glacier Bay, based on IfSAR bare earth Surficial geology of lower Glacier Bay, based on IfSAR bare earth

In this section

Glacial & cultural history of northern Lingít Aaní

A fireside presentation My talk at the Visitor Center in February, 2020 explored the past 20,000 years of glaciation and…

2020 | Richard Carstensen | 27 minutes

Clickable map of Southeast provinces

Hover over each numbered province; a click takes you to that sub-category