The pond breeders

Six species of amphibian are considered native to Southeast Alaska. Three anurans (the order of frogs and toads) are western toad, wood frog, and Columbia spotted frog. Three known caudates (the order of newts and salamanders) include rough-skinned newt, long-toed salamander, and northwestern salamander.

In addition to these native species, two frogs from the Pacific Northwest have been introduced: Pacific chorus frog and red-legged frog.

Reproductive stages of Southeast amphibians. Shown to scale; note shrinkage with metamorphosis. Dates are from Juneau observations: a) toad eggs in strings of jelly; b) wood frog eggs in softball-sized mass; c) newt egg deposited singly–coiled embryo soon to hatch; d) toad larva is dark charcoal–dorsal fin starts farther back than on larval frogs; e) frog larva more olive brown–dorsal fin attaches well forward of tail; f) newt larva has antler-like gills; g) toadlet has fat, warty body, and small hind legs; h) froglet has smoother skin and legs are more muscular than on toadlets; i) unlike anurans, newt metamorphs are proportioned like adults.

In this section

2002 fall newsletter: Tracking toads

. . .and other enigmatic amphibians Report on Discovery’s first year of research on amphibian habitat relations, on contract with…

2002 | Richard Carstensen, Kathy Hocker | 12 pages

Western toad declines

Mysterious declines As most longtime Southeast residents are aware, we‚’ve suffered a major decline in western toad, recently renamed Anaxyrus…

2014 | Richard Carstensen |

Streamwalking

Our laminated 4-fold guide to Streamwalking is the guide you’ll want in your pocket when you’re sleuthing the borders of…

2003 | Kathy Hocker & Richard Carstensen | 4-fold laminate

Habitat use of amphibians in northern Southeast Alaska

Final report on Discovery’s 2-year study of amphibian habitat relations. Population numbers, breeding pond origin types, and amphibian natural history…

2003 | Richard Carstensen, Mary Wilson, Robert Armstrong | 77 pages